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To This Day

For Bailey O’Neill and anyone else who has ever been bullied. This is “not your average bullying video.” *

*Thanks to The Buried Life for posting this on their Facebook page.

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2 thoughts on “To This Day

  1. OMG! That’s awesome!!! It’s so true.
    I started life as one of only two dark-skinned kids in my school (my grandmother is Indonesian and my great-grandmother Chinese, and I have their skin colour). My nickname was ‘Chocolate skin’ by the time I was 5yo.

    Then at 8yo my teacher prohibited the boys from playing with me because I was born a girl. I became “A Ding Dong Doggy’s Dinner” or “I Didn’a Piss Myself”. I had no friends because I was a girl who thought I was a boy so didn’t want to play with the girls.

    At 12 years old I went to high school. I didn’t fit in with the crowd because everyone knew I was different. I went home every day for six months covered in bruises from where the other kids beat me. But it was the names “skank” and “slut” that hurt the most.

    After six months I changed schools but already I was too afraid to make new friends. Then at 13 years old I came out as a lesbian. “Lebbo” became a taunt. I pretend these days that it didn’t matter. That it made me stronger but inside I still feel small.

    At 18 I became a man. The process was tough. I was a first year apprentice and a tradesman refused to call me “he”. He told me I would go to hell. Another treated me like a freak; someone to talk about behind my back. But worst another workgroup threatened to go on strike because I was using the men’s bathroom.

    I am now in my mid-30s and only scrabbled my way past the pain over the past 3 years. The damage of bullying is difficult to defeat. The sticks and stones rhyme is rubbish. And bullies should be stopped.

    I have experienced and witnessed bullying at all levels of society. We often blame school children. But bullying is institutionalised in our workplaces and our government. Watch Australia’s parliament in action on television and you’ll see what I mean. Until we stamp it out in adults, we’ll never be able to stamp it out in schools. But I like the way this video tries. It’s a novel and interesting approach.

    • Thank you so much for sharing your story Andrew. I think it is important that you did. I feel like a lot of people are afraid to share their bullying stories and I think if more people did, more things would be done to change it. I think your story is all too common and I’m so sorry you were treated that way. I hope that you know now how wrong those kids were and what a great person you are. Stay strong, and don’t let anyone make you feel small ever again.

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